Dwarf Planets

The International Astronomical Union defines a dwarf planet as a celestial body that
  (a) is in orbit around the Sun,
  (b) has sufficient mass for its self-gravity to overcome rigid body forces so that it assumes a hydrostatic equilibrium (nearly round) shape,
  (c) has not cleared the neighbourhood around its orbit, and
  (d) is not a satellite.

object ω
(°)

(°)
i
(°)
e
 
q
(AU)
a
(AU)
M
(°)
n
(°/day)
Q
(AU)
H
(mag)
P
(yrs)
T Epoch
(1) Ceres 73.4 80.3 10.6 0.08 2.55 2.77 103.0 0.214 2.99 3.3 4.60 2022-12-06.2 2024-03-31.0
(134340) Pluto 114.0 110.3 17.2 0.25 29.72 39.45 50.1 0.004 49.18 -0.5 248 1989-10-02.2 2024-03-31.0
(136199) Eris 150.8 36.1 43.8 0.43 38.62 68.14 210.0 0.002 97.65 -1.2 562 2258-07-30.7 2024-03-31.0
(136472) Makemake 296.5 79.3 29.0 0.16 37.86 45.33 168.1 0.003 52.80 -0.2 305 1881-09-25.2 2024-03-31.0
(136108) Haumea 240.9 121.9 28.2 0.20 34.35 42.90 220.3 0.004 51.45 0.2 281 2133-04-07.4 2024-03-31.0

The columns consist of:

  • object — number and name
  • ω — argument of perihelion (in degrees)
  • — ascending node (in degrees)
  • i — inclination (in degrees)
  • e — eccentricity
  • q — perihelion distance (in astronomical units)
  • a — semimajor axis (in astronomical units)
  • M — mean anomaly (in degrees)
  • n — mean daily motion (in degrees per day)
  • Q — aphelion distance (in astronomical units)
  • H — absolute magnitude
  • P — period (in years)
  • T — date of perihelion passage
  • Epoch — epoch of the orbital elements

Click on a object's number to go to a page providing details about it.